The cost of the freedom of speech

Among other cherished values, the First Amendment protects freedom of speech.

The cost of the freedom of speech

Hutchens The following excerpt was taken from " Freedom of Speech: Campus protests supporting or opposing a wide range of social issues have long been a part of the fabric of higher education.

At both public and private colleges and universities, students, faculty, and citizens beyond campus communities use higher education institutions—recognized as marketplaces of ideas—to voice opinions on countless issues through a variety of venues. Higher education professionals, particularly vice presidents for student affairs VPSAsunderstand that these opinions may or may not align with personal or institutional positions or values—but the optics can be confusing, and the costs are high and rising.

What costs must we consider as the debate around free speech evolves? The following top-of-mind issues are among the most significant concerns for many VPSAs and other higher education administrators: Public colleges and universities, and many private institutions, must first consider the legal cost.

Public institutions are bound by the First Amendment to allow—and even support—all protected speech. Due to legal obligations, it is now popular to "use" college campuses as the venues of choice for controversial speakers.

This choice has direct financial implications in terms of security for the speaker, space rental, crowd control, and other considerations. Another cost, arguably the most concerning, is the impact on campus climate and student success.

Students, especially those in underrepresented communities, are finding campuses "taken over" by external speakers and agendas. Legal Commitments When the topic of free speech comes up in meetings, legal issues immediately come to mind, and all eyes move toward the counsel in the room.

Given the current mood of the country, most higher education leaders have a handle on content neutrality and defining public versus limited forums for speech. VPSAs, among other administrators, understand their responsibility to uphold free speech rights, but they are also aware that an institution and its leaders can express values, such as a condemnation of hateful speech.

Questions pertaining to speech zones, as well as rising counterarguments related to institutional support for the First Amendment, merit further exploration.

Some campuses have come under fire for the continued practice of strict "free speech zones. However, if a faculty member is trying to teach and cannot be heard over the words of an activist outside campus buildings, the activities clearly interfere with the operations of the academy.

On the opposite side of the argument, strictly or unreasonably limiting where such speech can occur can be perceived as limiting speech. Over time the courts have offered mixed messages related to what constitutes public forums on college campuses.

The cost of the freedom of speech

At least eight states Arizona, Colorado, Kentucky, Missouri, North Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia, and Utah have adopted laws that limit speech zones on college campuses, and these efforts ultimately may eliminate speech zones at public colleges and universities in the United States.

To this end, VPSAs and other student affairs professionals should revisit campus policies to ensure free speech rights are reasonably supported alongside the operational needs and educational aims of the college or university. It is important to remember that time, place, and manner can be utilized to manage speech events.

Given the rise of external facilitation of events that may attract more aggressive and sometimes violent constituents, conduct codes and campus policies should be reviewed and, if necessary, be modified to reduce or eliminate risks.What is the cost of freedom of speech?

The cost of the freedom of speech

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Aug 21,  · Watch video · The Bill of Rights provides constitutional protection for certain individual liberties, including freedom of the press, freedom of speech, freedom of religion and the right to . Freedom of Speech: At What Cost? Published on March 20, By Brandi Hephner Labanc, Kerry Brian Melear, Frank Fernandez, and Neal H. Hutchens The following excerpt was taken from " Freedom of Speech: At What Cost? " published in the Spring edition of Leadership Exchange magazine. Freedom of Speech: At What Cost? Published on March 20, By Brandi Hephner Labanc, Kerry Brian Melear, Frank Fernandez, and Neal H. Hutchens The following excerpt was taken from " Freedom of Speech: At What Cost? " published in the Spring edition of Leadership Exchange magazine.

Free Speech—At a Price From Dirty Truths by Michael Parenti. So when it comes to freedom of speech, some people have their voices amplified tens of millions of times, while others must cup their hands and shout at the passing crowd.

Origins Of Free Press

The Freedom of Power We are taught to think of freedom as something antithetical to power. Freedom of Speech, the Internet, and the Costs of Control: The French Example New York University Journal of International Law & Politics, Vol. 33, p. , 56 Pages Posted: 5 . Apr 09,  · The High Cost of Free Speech.

Christie, the governor of New Jersey, apologized profusely after referring in his speech to the “occupied territories,” a term offensive to Adelson. Freedom of speech should not be protected at all cost.

All of us can be affected by many reasons if freedom of speech was protected at all cost. To begin with, bullying would increase in society.

Free Speech—At a Price From Dirty Truths by Michael Parenti. So when it comes to freedom of speech, some people have their voices amplified tens of millions of times, while others must cup their hands and shout at the passing crowd.

The Freedom of Power We are taught to think of freedom as something antithetical to power.

The Price of Freedom