Cognitive approach to psychology

The information processing approach to cognition. Retrieved [date] from, http:

Cognitive approach to psychology

Saul McLeodpublishedupdated Cognitive behavioral therapy CBT can be used to treat people with a wide range of mental health problems.

Jean Piaget () was one of the most influential researchers in the area of developmental psychology during the 20th century. Piaget originally trained in the areas of biology and philosophy and considered himself a "genetic epist e mologist."He was mainly interested in the biological influences on "how we come to know." He believed that what distinguishes human beings from other. Educational psychology is the branch of psychology concerned with the scientific study of human rutadeltambor.com study of learning processes, from both cognitive and behavioral perspectives, allows researchers to understand individual differences in intelligence, cognitive development, affect, motivation, self-regulation, and self-concept, as well as their role in learning. Different approaches to psychotherapy Psychologists generally draw on one or more theories of psychotherapy. A theory of psychotherapy acts as a roadmap for psychologists: It guides them through the process of understanding clients and their problems and developing solutions.

CBT is based on the idea that how we think cognitionhow we feel emotion and how we act behavior all interact together. Specifically, our thoughts determine our feelings and our behavior. Therefore, negative and unrealistic thoughts can cause us distress and result in problems.

When a person suffers with psychological distress, the way in which they interpret situations becomes skewed, which in turn has a negative impact on the actions they take. CBT aims to help people become aware of when they make negative interpretations, and of behavioral patterns which reinforce the distorted thinking.

Cognitive therapy helps people to develop Cognitive approach to psychology ways of thinking and behaving which aims to reduce their psychological distress.

Cognitive behavioral Cognitive approach to psychology is, in fact, an umbrella term for many different therapies that share some common elements. Beck in the s. This faulty thinking may be through cognitive deficiencies lack of planning or cognitive distortions processing information inaccurately.

If our mental representations are inaccurate or our ways of reasoning are inadequate then our emotions and behavior may become disordered. The cognitive therapist teaches clients how to identify distorted cognitions through a process of evaluation. The clients learn to discriminate between their own thoughts and reality.

They learn the influence that cognition has on their feelings, and they are taught to recognize observe and monitor their own thoughts.

The behavior part of the therapy involves setting homework for the client to do e. The therapist gives the client tasks that will help them challenge their own irrational beliefs.

The idea is that the client identifies their own unhelpful beliefs and them proves them wrong.

Early history

As a result, their beliefs begin to change. For example, someone who is anxious in social situations may be set a homework assignment to meet a friend at the pub for a drink. The goal of the therapy is to change irrational beliefs to more rational ones.

REBT encourages a person to identify their general and irrational beliefs e. I must be perfect" and subsequently persuades the person challenge these false beliefs through reality testing.

Cognitive approach to psychology

Albert Ellisproposes that each of us hold a unique set of assumptions about ourselves and our world that serve to guide us through life and determine our reactions to the various situations we encounter.

Albert Ellis calls these basic irrational assumptions. Some people irrationally assume that they are failures if they are not loved by everyone they know - they constantly seek approval and repeatedly feel rejected. According to Ellis, these are other common irrational assumptions: Ellis believes that people often forcefully hold on to this illogical way of thinking, and therefore employs highly emotive techniques to help them vigorously and forcefully change this irrational thinking.

The first three steps analyze the process by which a person has developed irrational beliefs and may be recorded in a three-column table. The first column records the objective situation, that is, an event that ultimately leads to some type of high emotional response or negative dysfunctional thinking.

In the second column, the client writes down the negative thoughts that occurred to them. The third column is for the negative feelings and dysfunctional behaviors that ensued.

The negative thoughts of the second column are seen as a connecting bridge between the situation and the distressing feelings. The third column C is next explained by describing emotions or negative thoughts that the client thinks are caused by A.

This could be anger, sorrow, anxiety, etc. Ellis believes that it is not the activating event A that causes negative emotional and behavioral consequences Cbut rather that a person interpret these events unrealistically and therefore has a irrational belief system B that helps cause the consequences C.

The Activating event, A, is that she failed her test. The Belief, B, is that she must have good grades or she is worthless. The Consequence, C, is that Gina feels depressed. After irrational beliefs have been identified, the therapist will often work with the client in challenging the negative thoughts on the basis of evidence from the client's experience by reframing it, meaning to re-interpret it in a more realistic light.

This helps the client to develop more rational beliefs and healthy coping strategies. A therapist would help Gina realize that there is no evidence that she must have good grades to be worthwhile, or that getting bad grades is awful.

She desires good grades, and it would be good to have them, but it hardly makes her worthless. If she realizes that getting bad grades is disappointing, but not awful, and that it means she is currently bad at math or at studying, but not as a person, she will feel sad or frustrated, but not depressed.

The sadness and frustration are likely healthy negative emotions and may lead her to study harder from then on. Critical Evaluation Rational emotive behavior therapists have cited many studies in support of this approach.The cognitive approach is one of the units in the core.

The unit focuses on two different cognitive processes - memory and decision making. There are clear links between the memory aspect of the unit and Theory of Knowledge. Quality of Life Therapy: Applying a Life Satisfaction Approach to Positive Psychology and Cognitive Therapy 1st Edition.

IB Psychology: Cognitive approach

Cognitive Psychology is concerned with advances in the study of attention, memory, language processing, perception, problem solving, and thinking. Cognitive Psychology specializes in extensive articles that have a major impact on cognitive theory and provide new theoretical advances.

Models of decision-making usually focus on cognitive, situational, and socio-cultural variables in accounting for human performance.

However, the emotional component is . A Dynamic Systems Approach to the Development of Cognition and Action presents a comprehensive and detailed theory of early human development based on the principles of dynamic systems theory.

Beginning with their own research in motor, perceptual, and cognitive development, Thelen and Smith raise fundamental questions about prevailing assumptions in the field. Cognitive psychology explores the branch of mental science that deals with motivation, problem-solving, decision-making, thinking, and attention.

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